Matthew Bourne’s Sleeping Beauty (photo: Hugo Glendinning)
Matthew Bourne’s Sleeping Beauty

Sadler’s Wells awakes Sleeping Beauty

Published March 6, 2015

Matthew Bourne’s 2012 Olivier Award nominated gothic production of Sleeping Beauty will return to Sadler’s Wells this Christmas for a festive eight-week London run.

The fastest ever selling production in world renowned choreographer Bourne’s much loved company New Adventures’ history, Sleeping Beauty wowed audiences when it premiered as part of its 25th birthday celebrations.

As with all of New Adventures’ dance productions, Bourne has given the classic fairy tale of a young girl cursed to sleep for 100 years plenty of exciting twists that keep audiences on their toes as much as the ballet dancers that feature in the cast.

The original story is set in 1890, when a curse casts Aurora into her magical slumber. Bourne’s innovative production also starts at this point, but when the Princess awakes a century later, she finds herself in a whole new modern world complete with mobile phones, night clubs and a whole new generation of Royals.

Speaking about its return, Bourne said today: “The unprecedented success of New Adventures Sleeping Beauty took us all by surprise in 2012 becoming our most popular production, uniformly selling out on its first UK tour and reaching 98% box office for its eight-week season at Sadler’s Wells before it had even opened!

“For me, it is one of New Adventures’ finest achievements and the piece of which I am personally most proud. It also celebrates 20 years of working with my brilliant colleague, Lez Brotherston, who was rightly nominated for an Olivier Award for his glorious work on this production. I’m delighted that New Adventures will be waking up the Princess Aurora after only three years – 100 years seemed just too long to wait!”

The supernatural love story will play at Sadler’s Wells from 1 December to 24 January before setting off on a worldwide tour.

"I’m delighted that New Adventures will be waking up the Princess Aurora after only three years – 100 years seemed just too long to wait!”