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Piccadilly Theatre

Closed until: 27 November 2020

More Information

Access

Sound Amplification:

Sennheiser Infrared

Toilets:

Accessible toilets available on street level (Royal Circle). Ladies and Gents toilets for the Stalls are 8 steps down from the entrance to the auditorium. In the Royal Circle, the Ladies toilets are 8 steps up from the bar, and the Gents toilets are 15 steps down and then 7 up from the bar level. There are 70 steps up to the Grand Circle Bar, with the Ladies on the way up and the Gents at the top.

Guide Dogs Policy:

Guide, hearing and other working dogs are welcome in all parts of the theatre.

Wheelchairs:

3 x wheelchair spaces in Royal Circle per performance

Access from Street to Foyer:

Level access

Access From Theatre Foyer To Seat:

22 steps to Stalls, 30 to Royal Circle, 70 to Grand Circle

Level Access:

Royal Circle

Contact

Contact the venue:

0844 871 7630 (Calls cost 7p per min plus your telephone company's network access charge)

Your Visit

Security Information:

Security note: For your comfort and security, you may be subject to additional checks on your visit to London theatres. Please contact the venue for more information.

Bar:

4 licensed bars. Drinks may be brought to disabled customers in the auditorium. Stalls bar is down 22 steps from the foyer, Royal Circle bar up 26 steps up from the foyer. There are 70 steps up to the Grand Circle bar. Bars have limited seating.

Air Conditioned:

Yes

Accepts Theatre Tokens:

Yes

History

The Piccadilly Theatre was built in 1928 by Bertie Crewe and Edward A. Stone for Edward Laurillard. It has a 1,232 seat auditorium with a memorable and unique Art Deco design. The theatre was as spectacular on its opening day as it is now, as the original brochure claimed that “if all the bricks used in the building were laid in a straight line, they would stretch from London to Paris.”

In its early years, the Piccadilly Theatre was briefly taken over by Warner Brothers and operated as a cinema using the Vitaphone system. There, it premièred the first talking picture to be shown in Great Britain, The Singing Fool with Al Jolson. He also opened the Jazz Singer in 1928 and appeared afterward on-stage to sing Mammie. Since then, the Piccadilly has presented most forms of stage entertainment – from hard-hitting drama Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? (with its original Broadway cast), to A Night With Dame Edna.

Having been opened under the name The Piccadilly Theatre, it was relaunched in 1936 as a cabaret restaurant called London Casino. It was badly damaged in World War II and underwent many renovations before reopening under its original name of The Piccadilly Theatre in the early 1950s.

In the 1960s and 1970s, the theatre hosted many Broadway productions as they migrated to the West End including A Street Car Named Desire and Man Of La Mancha. Also during the 1960s, The Beatles recorded some songs there for a BBC Radio production.

There have been a variety of Royal Shakespeare Company productions there including Edward II starring Ian McKellen, and Henry Fonda also made his West End debut in the solo play, Clarence Darrow.

If you click through to seat selection (where you'll see either best available or a seating plan), you will be seeing the most up-to-date prices. If this differs from what we've written on the calendar, please bear with us, as those prices will update soon.

We now sell our famous TKTS Booth discounts online here at Official London Theatre.

We are now cancelling all performances up until and including 31 May 2020 to help us process existing bookings whilst we wait for further clarity from the government in terms of when we will be able to reopen.

We are so sorry that in these testing and difficult times you are not able to enjoy the show you have booked for and hope the following helps clarify next steps in respect of your tickets .

There is nothing that you need to do if your performance has been cancelled, but we do ask for your patience.

If you have booked directly with the theatre or show website for an affected performance, please be assured that they will contact you directly to arrange an exchange for a later date, a credit note/voucher or a refund. If you have booked via a ticket agent they will also be in contact with you directly.

We are processing in strict date order of performance, so you are likely to be contacted after the date you were due to go to the theatre. However, we want to reassure you that you will be contacted, and your order will be processed, but please do bear with us.

We’d like to thank everyone who has been patient and kind in dealing with their ticket providers so far and we are sorry that we cannot process your order as quickly as we would like.

Please do not contact your credit card company as that will slow the process down and put an additional burden on our box office and ticket agent teams.

In order for us to serve our audiences the best we can, please do not get in touch with your point of sale if you have booked for performances after 31 May. Please be reassured that if we have to cancel future performances you will be directly contacted by your theatre or ticket provider. Our producers continue to plan for all eventualities dependent on the individual needs of their shows and we will provide further updates on specific shows as and when they become available.

We look forward to welcoming you back into our theatres as soon as we are allowed to resume performances. In the meantime stay safe and healthy.

While theatres are currently closed, various venues and productions are making announcements for their individual shows, including cancellations and rescheduled performances. Please check with the individual shows for details.