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Not About Heroes set for London run

Published August 15, 2014

Stephen Macdonald’s Not About Heroes, a World War I drama charting the friendship of two of the greatest war poets, will end its forthcoming UK tour with an autumn run at the Trafalgar Studio 2.

Starring Alasdair Craig as Siegfried Sassoon and Simon Jenkins as Wilfred Owen, Not About Heroes will arrive at the intimate studio theatre from 10 November to 6 December.

Directed by Caroline Clegg, the Feelgood Theatre production charts the relationship between the two men whose poetry became the voice of a generation and a world changed forever. Set in 1917, the drama weaves together letters, poetry and autobiographic writing, taking the story from Craiglockhart War Hospital, where the pair met, to the battlefield.

Speaking about the drama, which will, prior to its London engagement, tour to significant venues in the poets’ lives, director Clegg and founder of Feelgood Theatre, commented: “Not About Heroes is an exquisite play of love, courage and conflict. As a director I continue to grapple with the unfathomable questions of the First World War, a conflict that still reverberates deep in our psyche. Whilst this play can’t answer those questions it explores them with wit and dexterity – the poetry enables us to bear witness on a personal leveI that affects the head and heart.”  

Running alongside the production’s run is a national search to find the war poets of today, Whispers Of War. Launched with the support of Hollywood star Jason Isaac, the competition encourages amateur poets from the military and civilian community to express their views and experiences of conflict through the art form.

Not About Heroes will follow current musical Dessa Rose, which plays until 30 August, and Chris Urch’s debut play Land Of Our Fathers at the Trafalgar Studio 2.

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“As a director I continue to grapple with the unfathomable questions of the First World War, a conflict that still reverberates deep in our psyche."