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Mark Heap and Robert Webb in Jeeves And Wooster In Perfect Nonsense (Photo: Uli Weber)

Mark Heap and Robert Webb in Jeeves And Wooster In Perfect Nonsense (Photo: Uli Weber)

Robert Webb joins Jeeves And Wooster

Published 3 February 2014

Robert Webb and Mark Heap will take over from Stephen Mangan and Matthew Macfadyen as the comic duo at the heart of West End hit Jeeves And Wooster In Perfect Nonsense from 7 April.

Webb and Heap will play Bertie Wooster and Jeeves respectively in Robert and David Goodale’s acclaimed play that is currently booking at the Duke of York’s Theatre until 20 September. Mark Hadfield will continue in the role of Seppings.

Based on P G Wodehouse’s popular novels, Jeeves And Wooster In Perfect Nonsense sees a delightful trip to the countryside take a turn for the worse as the charmingly incompetent Wooster is called upon to play matchmaker. If he and his ever-dependable butler Jeeves don’t succeed in bringing his host’s drippy daughter and his newt-fancying acquaintance together, Wooster will be forced to abandon his cherished bachelor status and marry the girl himself.

Webb is best known for his on screen roles in Peep Show and That Mitchell And Webb Look, in which he starred alongside long-time collaborator David Mitchell. The actor was last seen on the London stage inSimon Paisley Day’s play Raving at the Hampstead Theatre in 2013. Prior to last year’s stage outing, Webb made his West End debut in the UK premiere of Fat Pig at the Trafalgar Studios.

He is joined by another actor well-known for his television comedy roles. For Heap, these have included Spaced, Friday Night Dinner and Green Wing, in which he starred alongside current Wooster, Mangan. The British actor has also appeared on screen in much-loved series Death In Paradise, Lark Rise To Candleford, Miranda and Skins.

Sean Foley’s acclaimed production opened at the Duke of York’s Theatre in November 2013, when it was described by Official London Theatre’s Charlotte Marshall as “a perfectly jolly, ridiculously dotty festive treat [that] more than lives up to its name.”

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