Dawn French brings solo show to London

Published April 23, 2015

The quiet village of Dibley will be a distant memory for Dawn French this winter as the actress and comedian brings her solo show 30 Million Minutes to the bright lights of London’s West End.

The Vicar Of Dibley star will take to the stage of the Vaudeville Theatre from 11 November to 5 December to take audiences through the inevitably hilarious lessons that life has taught her.

Taking its name from the duration of time she’s been alive “give or take a few minutes”, the show promises various delights and riches with the odd irksome tribulation thrown in. In the words of French, “It’s not a play, it’s not stand up, it’s not a monologue, it’s not a slide show, but it’s something a bit like all of those with some alarming extreme striptease thrown in.”

One half of comedy duo French And Saunders, French may be best known for her comic capers on screen, but the actress returns to the stage following appearances in productions including La Fille Du Régiment at the Royal Opera House.

Talking about her forthcoming theatrical foray, French said: “I shall be buying new pants in honour of this exciting opportunity to bring my show into London’s glittery West End, so every audience member can relax in the knowledge that I will be fully contained and utterly fragrant at all times.”

30 Million Minutes’ West End run follows a hugely successful UK tour, which saw the show being described as “A life affirming phenomenon” by The Telegraph and “Genuinely enlightening” by the Daily Express.

Tickets go on sale tomorrow but, before booking, consider French’s advice: “Please don’t bother with it if you don’t usually enjoy yourself, it’s only for marvellous lovely people. All grumpy f******s should stay at home. Those of us who DO turn up, myself included, will share an evening we won’t forget in a hurry.”

30 Million Minutes joins an eclectic line-up set to play at the Vaudeville Theatre in 2015. Current RSC hit Oppenheimer will be followed by one-man show Just Jim Dale, Michael Morpurgo’s I Believe In Unicorns and David Suchet in The Importance Of Being Earnest before French “grapples with the big stuff of life” in the winter.